Latest News

Archaeologists Use 3D Scanning Technology to model a Prehispanic Shaft Tomb.

Mexico City - 01/03/2011

 Archaeologists from the National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) conducted for the first time the three-dimensional registration of a shaft tomb, underground spaces used during Prehispanic time as funerary chambers in the western region of Mexico.

Archaeological sites in south Iraq have not been looted, say experts

Martin Bailey - 01/07/2008

 

Despite widely publicised fears of damage to ancient sites, a team of specialists found that eight of the most important have not been touched after 2003

Is Cleopatra's Needle Suffering from Erosion?

Kristina Cooke - 01/07/2011

The Egyptian government official charged with protecting his country's ancient monuments is threatening to take back an iconic obelisk in Central Park unless New York City takes steps to restore it.

Archaeologists Discover Cretan Tools That Point to 130,000 to 700,000-Year-Old Sea Travel

Copyright 2011 The Associated Press. - 01/10/2011


ATHENS (AP).- Archaeologists on the island of Crete have discovered what may be evidence of one of the world's first sea voyages by human ancestors, the Greek Culture Ministry said Monday

Exhibition at Canadian Museum of Civilization Explores the Vibrant Culture of the Haida

GATINEAU, QUEBEC - 01/10/2011

 The remarkable sophistication and complexity of the vibrant Haida culture is explored in a special exhibition presented through January 23, 2011 at the Canadian Museum of Civilization. Haida: Life. Spirit. Art. features more than 80 masterpieces from the outstanding Haida collection of the McCord Museum in Montréal.

Ancient Art and Deflation

Howard Nowes - 01/25/2009

Art objects and Deflation

The dividend of beauty is hard to put a monetary value on.  Pride of ownership aside, antiquities and tribal art is an excellent place to invest your money. It seems that the world needs to adjust to a new financial reality. A few months ago, inflation was a top worry, especially the impact of sky-high fuel prices, but now, although consumers can celebrate falling prices at the gas pump and sales on everyday items, an investors' worry is exactly the opposite. Instead of inflation, the problem is deflation, a downward drift in prices that squeeze profits and investor returns to uncomfortable levels.

Investing in Antiquties FORBES Article

Carrie Coolidge - 01/26/2008

Ancient Art has always been a serious fashionable collectable for educated investors. Michael H. Steinhardt believes there is money in antiquities. The legendardge-fund-manager-turned-full-time-philanthropist has quietly managed to assemble one of the largest and most important antiquities collections in the world. Now, he believes, its time has come.

"Ancient art has not appreciated much in value for a long time," says Steinhardt. "It has been under a certain
cloud because there are issues of provenance, which have made headlines in the last five- to 10-years and continue
to make headlines. 

Now in America Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs

Press Release - 01/28/2007

Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs opens February 3rd at The Franklin Institute in Philadelphia. Over 380,000 tickets have already been sold. A few tickets for opening week are available, buy now to be among the first to see Tutankhamun in Philadelphia! Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs is in London beginning November,...

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Forty Years of 'African Arts'

Herbert Cole - 02/01/2007

Herbert M. Cole looks at four decades of "African Arts" at UCLA and what the future may have in store for the journal and the field of African art. Without UCLA there would simply be no "African Arts."Celebrate African Arts, now entering into its fortieth year! Launched ambitiously in 1967, pledging a bilingual survey of all the...

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Brooklyn Museum Special Exhibition: Egypt Reborn: Art for Eternity

Press Release - 02/07/2010

Brooklyn Museum Special Exhibition: Egypt Reborn: Art for Eternity


Long-Term Installation
Egyptian Galleries, 3rd Floor

In April, 2003, the Brooklyn Museum completed the reinstallation of its world-famous Egyptian collection, a process that took ten years. Three new galleries joined the four existing ones that had been completed in 1993 to tell the story of Egyptian art from its earliest known origins (circa 3500 B.C.) until the period when the Romans incorporated Egypt into their empire (30 B.C.–A.D. 395). Additional exhibits illustrate important themes about Egyptian culture, including women's roles, permanence and change in Egyptian art, temples and tombs, technology and materials, art and communication, and Egypt and its relationship to the rest of Africa. More than 1,200 objects— comprising sculpture, relief, paintings, pottery, and papyri—are now on view, including such treasures as an exquisite chlorite head of a Middle Kingdom princess, an early stone deity from 265 to B.C., a relief from the tomb of a man named Akhty-hotep, and a highly abstract female terracotta statuette created over five thousand years ago.

Africa Tribal Art

American Indian Art

Asian Art

Classical Antiquities

Pre Columbian Art

 

 

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